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 Gender Expression, Radical Acceptance, and the Art of Self Portraiture

A picture says 1,000 words, but what words are being said and by who? 

Gender-diverse people often find themselves viewed through a lens - at the other end - with assumptions and expectations of a dominant society that has a binary narrative of what gender is and how it should be expressed. This workshop facilitated by Asterix Media is open to and centres anyone who is queer, trans, non-binary, Two-Spirit and/or otherwise gender diverse and welcomes an opportunity to flip that lens and reclaim agency over how they are perceived by others.

We will discuss accessible methods of expressing gender through clothing, makeup and self-portrait photography. Participants will learn how different lighting, camera setups and tools for editing can affect the story that is told through a photograph, as well as how to achieve certain outcomes on a budget.

Continue reading for registration information and to learn more about Asterix Media, the facilitators and the CARE project. For venue accessibility information and details, please visit www.khyber.ca/access or contact info@khyber.ca with any accessibility requests or inquiries. It is important and vital for us to do our best to ensure that your needs are met so you can fully participate and have fun without worry. Hope to see you there!!


FREE | Snacks and supplies provided | Register below 
All-ages workshop for those who are queer, trans, non-binary, Two-Spirit and/or otherwise gender diverse 
12-4PM on Sunday, June 9th 2019 @ The Khyber (1880 Hollis St)


Registration

Registration is closed - if you are interested in future workshops, please contact Jake at jake@asterix.media or 902-483-5652.

 

More Information

Asterix Media is a new non-profit organization dedicated to amplifying stories and voices of marginalized communities through filmmaking and other artistic practices. The majority of our work is centred on two main objectives - the creation of new media, and involving members of marginalized communities in discussions, creative process, and dissemination. With an emphasis on 2SLGBTQ+ people and their communities, Asterix Media looks to partner and collaborate as much as possible. Asterix Media is made up of two queer Haligonians, Steph Young and Jake Ivany, each bringing to the table almost 10 years of experience in facilitating the arts.

Instagram: @asterix.media | Facebook: AsterixMediaNS | Vimeo: asterixmedia

Steph Young is an award-winning filmmaker, visual artist, and drag performer based in Halifax, NS. In 2013, she received her BFA in Film from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University. Her work is heavily influenced by issues facing her as an active member of both the queer and mental health communities and have screened at film festivals across the globe. In addition to her personal work, she currently works with RADAR, a Canadian collective of filmmakers and academics who facilitate participatory video sessions and research with individuals who live with mental illness.

www.stephanieyoungart.ca | Instagram: @stephyoungfilm

Jake Ivany is a producer, filmmaker and experienced coordinator with a background in youth facilitation and digital media arts. A graduate of NSCC’s Screen Arts program, he has been based in Halifax, Nova Scotia for most of his life, but travels across the country when projects require it. His personal work is centred around lived experiences of being queer and empowering marginalized and underrepresented communities to reclaim their own narratives through digital media. Currently sitting on the board of the 1588 Barrington Preservation Society, a representative on the HRM Youth Advisory Committee Currently, and connections with several other arts non-profits in the city, he works as a festival director for an arts festival dedicated to persons with disabilities. 

www.jakeivany.com | Instagram: @jakeivany

For each project Asterix Media is involved in, they try to bring together other artists and partners with lived experience to assist in the event or workshop.

Brad Jones has worked with Asterix Media as a co-facilitator in past workshops and they have agreed to assist in this workshop as well. Brad is a Two-Spirit Anishinaabe interdisciplinary artist whose work examines and critiques notions of colonialism, sexuality and gender. Their work is embodied as the drag persona Jennifer Dafuque. Utilizing drag as an access point, performances become the embodiment of lived experiences that seek to present contemporary queer Indigenous experiences.

Instagram: @jenniferdafuque


The CARE project is a new framework focused on the development, writing and sharing of monthly thematic workshops and the facilitation of community-centric and formative artistic events. Together we will explore concepts such as, but not limited to: anti-oppressive arts practice, the importance of self-expression and art for our health, appropriation and assimilation aesthetics in the creative sector, supporting survivors of violence through a trauma-informed framework, artists resisting tokenism as well as tokenism vs. invitation in an art space setting. Through CARE we intend to create new space for collaboration, mentorship and peer-to-peer skill skare. We aim to reduce barriers that artists, community members, arts organizations face re: creating and attending arts-related events.

CARE is created in partnership with South House Sexual & Gender Resource Centre and supported by the Nova Scotia Culture Innovation Fund. For listings on other upcoming events and ways to get involved please visit our website below.

www.khyber.ca/CARE